The rise of Orthorexia in young people – when healthy eating becomes an obsession

By | Anxiety, Counselling, Depression, Eating disorders, Psychotherapy | 2 Comments

I remember back in the day when I was at university, I lived mainly on a diet of fast food, chips, copious cups of tea and last but not least, pints of diesel ( a potent concoction of lager, cider and blackcurrant squash) at night, down the student union.

This was pretty much standard fare for young people of my generation, and apart from the Rugby and Hockey club members, I can’t recall me or any of my friends ever setting foot in the gym. However there is now a massive trend in young people under 23 to embrace a very health conscious lifestyle.   So isn’t it a good thing that they are more aware of what they are eating, whether it is genetically modified, whether it contains saturated fats, sodium or sugar, whether it is processed or non processed, whether it is organic and so on ? Well, in some respects yes. The world has woken up to the fact that sugar is only healthy in moderation and can increase the risk of obesity, diabetes and heart disease; that it is highly addictive and has also been linked to depression. Food intolerances do exist, and, speaking from personal experience, having a greater awareness of what nutritionally works for you can really improve overall physical, mental and emotional well being.  Read More